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Uber Flying Taxi Rendering

Uber Works with NASA to get Flying Taxis Ready by 2020

The company has also announced Los Angeles as a third test city.

Rachel England | Engadget

They say the best revenge is living well, and so in the midst of its ongoing and messy breakup with London, Uber has proven it’s doing just fine thank you very much by signing an agreement with NASA to develop software for its proposed flying taxi project, Elevate.

At a speech at the Web Summit in Lisbon, Uber’s head of product Jeff Holden revealed the company has signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA to create the air traffic control system that will manage its low-flying taxi fleet, which it aims to have in the air by 2020. The company also announced that a third test city, Los Angeles, has been added to the program, joining Dallas-Fort Worth and Dubai. According to Uber, its UberAIR service could compress a one and a half hour journey from LAX to the Staples Center during rush hour to under 30 minutes.

Uber released a slick video, seen above, alongside its announcement, illustrating just how it envisions the Elevate service being used. It closes with the line “closer than you think”. With NASA’s clout behind the project, the idea of a flying taxi service is not only closer, but a whole lot more credible, too.

Read the full story at Engadget

More tech stories at LedeTree

About Rachel England

Rachel England
Rachel is a freelance reporter. She provides a range of editorial services to a variety of clients, including news and feature writing, sub-editing, proof reading and copywriting. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Times, The Telegraph, Women’s Health, Vice, All About History, Green Futures, The Big Issue, Print Week, Your Wedding and Positive News.

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