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The Lede

The Lede, for Jan. 10, 2018
By David Royse

WHAT’S NEW?

GOOD MORNING. Hope your day is off to a good start. If you need a little boost in your step as you get going click here and listen to the best day-starting song of all time, perhaps. (I’m open to suggestions if you disagree. dave.royse@ledetree.com or @daveroyse

We’re gonna have a good day!

If you haven’t already, follow @ledetree on Twitter. Follow interesting news about what’s new.

Welcome to tomorrow, today. New industries, ideas, big stories about stuff that you haven’t thought much about, but you should, because it is increasingly going to be part of our world. 
NATIONAL PRIORITY

BUT OURS GO TO 5G

Most network connections are 4G. But soon, they’ll go to 5G. I imagine the conversation about that going like this:

“Does that mean it’s faster?”

“Well, it’s one faster, isn’t it? It’s not 4G, you see. Most blokes will be playing at 4G. You’re on 4G, here, all the way up, all the way up, you’re on 4G, where can you go from there? Nowhere, exactly. If we need that extra push over the cliff, you know what we do? 5G. Exactly.”

“Why don’t you just make 4G faster? And then have 4G be the top number, and make that a little faster?”

“These go to 5G”

The move to 5G could be the thing that most affects your daily life that you’re not currently paying much attention to.

Federal Communications Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel says in a piece contributed to TechCrunch today that the United States needs to lead on this – for business reasons. After falling behind on 3G, the U.S. was a leader on 4G and it paid off for companies here, she notes.

“Today, with only five percent of the world’s population, we make up 15 percent of global 4G connections. Our companies run the operating systems on 9 out of 10 smartphones worldwide and our wireless services generate $400 billion in annual economic activity. In short, we led and our economy — and our citizens — benefited immensely.”

But with 5G, it’s a huge shift (they should probably just skip ahead and call it 7G). That’s because it’s about much more than just speeding up your Netflix downloads.

“These new networks will support dramatic gains in capacity with significant reductions in latency,” Rosenworcel writes in her piece, It’s Time to Chart a Course for 5G Success . “They will drive the evolution of the internet itself, powering the hyper-connected possibilities of the internet of things — from self-driving cars to virtual reality to other innovative uses that have yet to even be imagined.”

READ ROSENWORCEL’S FULL PIECE

While we’re listening to Rosenworcel, she called this week for the FCC to do a study of what happened to the infrastructure on Caribbean islands during Hurricane Maria and why networks have been slow to be restored, saying continuing outages are “not acceptable.”

“It’s been more than 100 days since #HurricaneMaria made landfall. Nearly 1 in 10 cell sites in #PuertoRico & 1 in 5 in #VirginIslands remain out of service. Not acceptable. It’s time for the @FCC to study what happened & issue a report so that in future disasters we do better,” she tweeted.

YOUR EMERGING NEW WORLD: 

THE TIDE OF CARMAKERS BUILDING IN THE SOUTH KEEPS ROLLING

The most celebrated foreign-sounding name in Alabama this week is Tua Tagovailoa. But they’ll be talking quite a bit today in Huntsville about Toyota-Mazda.

Alabama Open For Business Sign While car maker news is increasingly about ways to get people out of the driver’s seat, plain, old-fashioned regular cars still are selling and still have to be made. And the trend continues – they’re being made in the South.

Huntsville is getting the new Toyota-Mazda plant, with an announcement expected today.

Remember Huntsville? Heartland success story. We told you about Huntsville last month, right after the U.S. Senate election, in an effort to point out that despite a streak of anti-intellectualism in parts of the Heartland, there are places like Huntsville that are fully part of the new knowledge economy and don’t have any plans to go back to a time when some think America was greater.

A side-thought:

Much of 2017 was, in the national discussion, about the Trump phenomenon, and the changing image of “America” that spurred it. But as disaffected people in places like Youngstown, Detroit and other Rust Belt towns have watched their industry head off into the winds, they’ve directed much of their anger at the rest of the world outside the United States (global trade), and at the “elite” globalists who have made offshore production a thing. (The fact that many of those jobs weren’t moved anywhere and were just automated is another story.)

But you don’t often hear much anger directed at the places many of the jobs that did go really went: Alabama, Tennessee, South Carolina. When was the last time you heard some Rust Belt politician complain about jobs moving to the American South? How does protectionism stop that?

MORE CARS: HYUNDAI, VW PLAN DRIVERLESS TAXIS BY 2021

While workers in Huntsville will soon be driving new Toyotas off the line and out to the lot to await shipping, VW and Hyundai workers may not have to. Their cars could drive right out of the factory themselves and come pick you up.

“Volkswagen wants to put autonomous cars on the road in as many as five cities worldwide by that year, with ride-hailing available to customers. Meanwhile, Hyundai told WSJ that it’s hoping to put a fleet in operation on “commercial scale” by the same year, again using a self-driving taxi model for the rollout.”

IS THIS WHAT THEY MEAN BY SPY PHONES?

AT&T reportedly has canceled its plans to sell Huawei’s Mate 10 smartphone. The reason: Security. U.S. lawmakers say Huawei may engage in espionage for China. Uh, I have a Huawei phone. Hello, China.

Also in the News Today:

IMMIGRATION

A federal judge in California issued an injunction Tuesday ordering the administration to restart, at least for now, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, which protects people without legal residency who were brought to the U.S. as children. Trump, meanwhile, suggested he’d pair protections for undocumented young people with his desire for a border security wall on the Mexico border.

ENERGY

The Trump administration also on Tuesday dropped Florida from its plan for expanded offshore oil drilling, after opposition from Gov. Rick Scott.
SPONSORED CONTENT

Florida Residents: Florida TaxWatch wants to know which two tax law changes you’d be most interested in seeing lawmakers pass.

VOTE HERE

MORE TECH NEWS

THE COOLEST PLACE ON EARTH THIS MORNING – LAS VEGAS AT CES

It appears the government’s highly classified Zuma satellite may have been destroyed. But private contractor Space-X says, ‘Wasn’t our fault’

A couple more interesting things before you go on to have a good day:

SOME STUFF TO GO WITH YOUR NFL PLAYOFFS

If you, like me, are into sports and documentaries, I might have something for you. If you, like me, have a particular interest in what makes people succeed, this one looks good. (If you, like me, aren’t a big Tom Brady fan, well, it still sounds pretty good.)

Filmmaker Gotham Chopra got extraordinary access to Brady for a follow-through-his-life kind of documentary series. Chopra is the son of Deepak Chopra and is, as you might not be surprised to learn, interested in the spiritual side of sports. I personally don’t like Brady or the Patriots – and I’m not even much of an NFL fan, but I’ll check this one out.

NYT: ON TOM BRADY’S LIFE

AND since it’s playoff time, here’s just a little more NFL football for you:

If you are into the NFL, or if you’re interested in sports journalism, I also commend you to a podcast I thoroughly enjoyed recently. As I mentioned in Monday’s Lede, I spoke back in the fall with former Denver Broncos receiver Nate Jackson, who is a pretty thoughtful and interesting guy. He has gone on to his own writing career since hanging up his cleats. He also now has this podcast, called The Mindful Warrior. In a recent episode of the podcast, which Jackson does with another former player, Eben Britton, the pair talk to Stefan Fatsis, who is one of the absolute most interesting sports journalists working. It’s wide-ranging, with discussion of how football might change to reduce injuries, what drove big NFL TV deals, and Fatsis’ time suiting up through training camp as a kicker for the Broncos.

NEXT GENERATION

And finally, something I’d like to make at least a semi-regular feature – my regular sign that the future is bright because of the promise of young people. I found this one because I have a little geeky side interest in how the body handles stress, and whether stress can kill us at an early age. This girl is going to help us all understand that. READ ABOUT SPACE GIRL
WHAT ALEXA TOLD ME TODAY:

Alexa says it’s Dark Chocolate Day. Get your flavonoids!  Monday I wrote a little about the potential neuroprotectant qualities of cannabidiol – but these researchers say dark chocolate flavonoids may also be immunity for your brain

OK, we’re gonna have a good day. Save that trouble for another day.

Tips: email me: dave.royse@ledetree.com Or hit me up on Twitter

 

About David Royse

David Royse is the Editor-in-Chief of Ledetree.com. He has been a professional journalist for more than 20 years, including stints with The Associated Press and The News Service of Florida. He enjoys writing about health and medical science, and hopeful stories about scientific breakthroughs and new technology.

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