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nuTonomy Driverless Car in Boston

Monday Eye Opener: The Futures of Bitcoin and in Boston, are they Driverless Cahs?

BITCOIN STILL HASN’T CRASHED AND NEITHER HAVE THE LYFT DRIVERLESS CARS IN BOSTON

David Royse | LedeTree

Happy Monday and welcome back.

BITCOIN, THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE? NOW TRADING IN FUTURES

Tech news bleeds into the mainstream this morning. Cryptocurrencies – at least in the public mind – haven’t exactly been embraced by the suited Wall Street types. Well, that’s not totally true. I spoke this weekend with a banker at a major international firm who has been watching Bitcoin and other crypotcurrencies for years, and trying to figure out all the thorny legal fears and compliance issues that go with them. The bank is smart enough to know that it needs to know a lot about cryptocurrencies, which seem to be becoming less crypto and more currency every day, at least in perception, which is mostly what matters.

Bitcoin Stock Photo

The mainstreaming of Bitcoin continued this weekend, as trading in futures on the cryptocurency began on the Chicago Board of Exchange futures market Sunday night. Predictably, the price went up, just as the underlying spot price of Bitcoin has. Bitcoin has been the big story in tech business and in investing for the last few weeks as the price has surged. Now the suits may want in too.

More on early Bitcoin futures trading on the CBOE in our story here.

SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE – DRIVERLESS IN BOSTON

It’s an ongoing question for the techies, and the people who compile those clickbait best places for various kinds of people to live articles that require you to go through a slideshow to see the seventh best city: which city will be the first to actually have lots of people riding around in driverless cars they’ve hailed on their app to take them to get their latte?

NuTonomy Driverless Car

San Francisco? Austin? Seattle? Boston has been on that list – and really stepped on the gas (is this a metaphor that will disappear once there are no longer people stepping on pedals in cars?  Or for that matter once cars are no longer burning gas)? this past week.

Rideshare service Lyft and autonomous car software company nuTonomy rolled driverless test cars out in Boston, picking up Lyft riders. There were safety drivers and engineers in the cars, too – but they were probably better to share the ride with than those drunk conventioneers you shared a car with last time.

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A few other interesting things we’re noting this morning:

IF ONLY THE BENGALS AND REDS HAD RENEWABLE ENERGY

Starting next month, the city of Cincinnati’s government buildings, from the police stations to rec centers to City Hall, will be powered entirely by renewable energy. The city announced this past week that it has signed a deal with Dynegy to purchase 100 percent green power for its buildings. The deal is expected to reduce the city’s greenhouse gas emissions by nearly 10 percent.

Mayor John Cranley wants the city as a whole to be using 100 percent renewable energy by 2035. As part of that, the city is building 25 megawatts of solar panels – the largest of any city in the country.

HURRICANE DEATH TOLL IN PUERTO RICO DISPUTED

Puerto Rico official Hurricane Maria Death Toll Climbs, but Some Think Toll May Be Much Higher

Puerto Rico Recovery - BloombergTV

Government officials in Puerto Rico announced over the weekend that the official death toll from September’s Hurricane Maria is now 64. But, as the New York Times reported on Friday, there are suspicions that the actual death toll may be much, much higher. In the five weeks after the storm hit, the number of people who died on the island was far, far higher than it should have been in a non-hurricane year. The Times reported there were over a thousand more deaths on Puerto Rico during that period than during the same periods in the previous two years.

 

The Day Max Born was Born

Google Doodle of Max Born

Today’s Google Doodle honors Max Born, the German-born physicist who figured out that scientists could use probability to predict the location of particles in a quantum system, rather than a complex equation meant to determine a particle’s exact location. Forbes, perhaps, has the best non-technical explanation

Born won the 1954 Nobel Prize in physics for his research in quantum mechanics. He was Born on this day in 1882.

Robert Oppenheimer, who headed the American Manhattan Project to develop the atomic bomb during WWII, studied under Born in graduate school, and Born’s assistants also included Enrico Fermi, whose work would also be critical to the development of the bomb. Fortunately for the Allies, in the 1930s Born emigrated out of Germany to England because of his family’s Jewish background. He was a professor in Scotland during the war. The music world celebrates Born’s emigration as well. In England, Born’s daughter married Welshman Brinley Newton-John. Their daughter is Olivia.

Have a good week.

About David Royse

David Royse
David Royse is the Editor-in-Chief of Ledetree.com. He has been a professional journalist for more than 20 years, including stints with The Associated Press and The News Service of Florida. He enjoys writing about health and medical science, and hopeful stories about scientific breakthroughs and new technology.

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